Walker Travels Over 6,000 Miles to Discuss State Budgets

Last week, before Governor Scott Walker (R-WI) departed for Israel, we had a few questions we were hoping he'd address during his time abroad. Among those questions were some inquiries about Gov. Walker's foreign policy experience (or lack thereof), particularly given his previous missteps in that particular arena. As JTA reported (not from on site, of course), the governor had a chance to answer those concerns. When given the chance to prove himself as a serious challenger on the world stage, however, Gov. Walker instead chose to discuss... state budgets.

JTA's Ron Kampeas writes:

When Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker went to London in February, he declined to answer all questions journalists posed about foreign policy. Wisconsin governors, which Scott Walker is, do not need to know loads about foreign policy. But presidential candidates, which Scott Walker wants to be, do...

Even without reporters around, Walker managed to convey a lack of interest in foreign policy, thanks to the report from his meeting with Yuval Steinitz, Israel’s minister of intelligence.

Now, Steinitz is perhaps Israel’s best explainer of his country’s opposition to the emerging Iran deal... But when Steinitz wanted to talk to the Wisconsin governor and putative presidential candidate about the Iran deal, Walker instead wanted to talk about state budgets.

Steinitz’s release, in toto, is translated from Hebrew, below, but first, let me do some explaining myself: I’ve read a zillion of these “Israeli minister meets foreign dignitary” releases. They are generally structured as follows: “Israeli minister says X is very important, for these reasons. Foreign dignitary agrees that X is important, for the very same reasons.”

So:

The Intelligence Minister, Dr. Yuval Steinitz, yesterday afternoon hosted Scott Walker, the governor of Wisconsin. The governor came to Steinitz’s office principally for an update on the Iranian nuclear matter and for a review of Israel’s objections to the emerging deal.

The two discussed economic matters, and the governor expressed enthusiastic support for the two-year budget when [Steinitz] was minister of finance. Walker said he, too, runs a two-year budget in the state of Wisconsin. Both men agreed that this (two-year budgets) improves government operations and allows for long-term planning.

The release had attached to it a photo of Steinitz receiving what it described as Walker’s “modest gift of a tie.”

State budgets are obviously of extreme importance, particularly to Wisconsin's chief executive. However, it does seems a bit odd that Gov. Walker would travel over 6,000 miles from Madison, WI to Jerusalem to discuss them. Given Gov. Walker's recent issues with subtraction, we do hope that he rethinks his decision to cut education funding from those budgets.